peeps: Lily Lexington

The very prolific children’s book self-publisher Lily Lexington was a no-brainer choice for me to feature as a Wordpreneur Peeps: I read many of her rhyming children’s books to my 4yo Daniel at bedtime. In a recent visit to her Amazon author page, I counted 29 titles — it seems like she releases a new Kindle book weekly! Two of my boy’s favorites, for example, are My Dinosaur is Scared of Vegetables and The Great Dinosaur Race (you think he likes dinosaurs?).

It was no surprise to learn that Lily is a mother herself — of three children, aged 3, 5 and 7. Her kids no doubt inspire many of her stories, but she points out that she is “quirky” and “often seen walking around the house singing rhymes to herself.” As for her publishing projects, it also helps that her husband is very supportive of her writing and has an IT background, with “the technical skills to put together my books for me.”

How Lily Got Started Self-Publishing

Lily first got interested in self-publishing her own books after seeing Kindle books appear on Amazon when she was shopping for a novel to read. She thought, “Wow! I don’t need to have an agent or a publishing contract, I can just write and be published!” She then read a few success stories of other authors who’ve self-published on the Kindle, and she was bitten.

As for her own sales success, she doesn’t have the exact figure available right now, but she figures that she has now sold well over 50,000 copies of her books on the Kindle.

Publishing Observations

Lily believes that children’s books are going to become way more interactive: “More Kindle books will come with audio and kids will also be able to ‘play’ with the characters inside of their books in an app type environment. Touching pictures will also come with sounds.”

She points out that electronic publications with this kind of interactivity are already appearing on the Apple platform, and she anticipates that the technology “will form a larger part of the ebook experience.”

As for adult fiction, she sees the industry moving towards shorter type stories.

Self-Publishing Tips

  • “Get an editor.”
  • “Road test your books on friends and family and other people whose opinion you value. If you can get unbiased feedback, it will improve your writing immeasurably so don’t take aim at the reviewers. People will come back at your work with unseen angles and perspectives. I have learnt the hard way on this before.”
  • “Write stories other people want to read, rather than stories you think other people want to read.”

Check out Lily’s author page and books for sale on Amazon.com. You can also sign up and join her email mailing list to receive notices of her new book releases.

Article by Eldon Sarte